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EF webinar: Impact of The Pandemic in Latin America – Understanding doctors’ perspectives

In September 2019, Fine Research began an unprecedented study in the region of challenges in the medical profession. Two months before the pandemic outbreak in Wuhan, their team asked doctors in North and Latin America about the health situation in their countries and their level of preparedness in case of a calamity. With the start of the pandemic, Fine Research decided to start a series of projects on #COVID19. The latest piece, completed in late May 2020, involved a large-scale fieldwork in 16 countries, interviewing over 5000 physicians in Latin America with the aim of understanding the main challenges they face in the midst of the pandemic.

The project, which was shared in the media in several countries in Latin America, details the impact of COVID-19 in the region grouping insights into four main axes: assessment of policies, evidence on the pandemic, impact in doctors and future scenarios.

For this webinar, Diego Casaravilla, Fine Research Director will be joined by Ana Maria Mendéz, National Fundraising Director, Save The Children (Colombia).

You will discover answers to:

– What were the main health priorities before the pandemic?

– How do doctors rate hospital infrastructures and country policies?

– What are the new professional challenges for doctors?

– How has the current context impacted doctors emotionally?

– How has the pandemic affected treatment adherence for Cancer, HIV or Diabetes patients?

– What future scenarios do HCPs imagine will be likely to happen?

Attendees will have a better understanding of the near term, and longer-lasting consumer impacts and changes as a result of COVID-19.

 

Diego has founded and fully manages Fine Research, an independent MR data collection network in Latin America with offices in Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, Argentina and Uruguay. His agency focuses on healthcare., consumer and b2b fielding. Created in 2008, Fine Panel, is the first and largest panel of Healthcare professionals in LatAm with over 100,000 active members in this region.

 

Ana Maria is Marketing and Fundraising Director of Save The Children Colombia. She holds and MA in Marketing and over 6 years of experience in the sector and has coordinated the launch of several marketing campaigns that yielded over 250% annual growth in funds raised over the past three years.

 

Live webinar 23 July 2020, 17:00 C.E.S.T | 12:00 GMT-3 

 

                                   

EF webinar: Understanding and Planning for Consumer Changes as We Adapt to The New Normal

ITWP companies Toluna, Harris Interactive and KuRunData have developed Global Barometer that’s run in 19 markets every two weeks.  The study provides insights into the impact that the Coronavirus pandemic has had on daily life, the way people shop, the products they purchase, and ultimately what behaviors we anticipate consumers continuing when the pandemic is over.

We’ll speak about the following;

  • Government involvement – In the eyes of consumers, brands haven’t been perceived as supportive during this crisis. However, retail establishments have been well-perceived.  Many consumers feel that governments and brands need to work together during the pandemic, however they don’t see this happening any time soon.
  • Consumer stress and consumption impacts – Consumers are stressed and behaving differently as a result.  They report that they want to take care of themselves, but have also reported that they’re eating poorly, and taking less exercise.
  • Restrictions have been eased, what will consumers feel comfortable doing – Many are looking forward to business as usual, and venturing out, but they will be more conservative financially (and take fewer health risks).
  • Where will people spend, where won’t they – Again, we’ve seen consumers react to the pandemic in many ways.  People have reported that they will be more financially conservative, but do place value on giving back to their community and charity in new ways.

Attendees will have a better understanding of the near term, and longer-lasting consumer impacts and changes as a result of COVID-19.

 

Frédéric is an industry visionary and speaks often among industry leaders about the transformation of market research, impacts of automation and more. As CEO of ITWP, Frederic leads a staff of more than 1,400 spanning 24 offices and 5 continents as Toluna and Harris Interactive Europe.

 

Janice is a marketing professional with close to 20 years experience and a proven track record for developing results-oriented marketing programs. She couples senior-level experience with tactical know-how that spans enterprise-wide strategic branding programs through to digital and social marketing strategies.

 

Live webinar 24 June 2020, 17:00 C.E.S.T | 11:00 US E.S.T. 

 

                                   

EF webinar: Thriving During Crises

Thriving During Crises Webinar Rescheduled – New Date & Time To Be Announced!

Right now your organisation is probably facing some variants of these three questions.

How should you deliver your offer? How can your communication messages cut through? And, of course, how do you ensure income keeps flowing?

‘Thriving During Crises’ will explore the intersection of research, crisis communications and leadership.

This webinar presented by Patrick Olszowski from Outrageous Impact will offer practical tips and steps you can take today to start to prepare your organisation to weather the storm and be ready, for whatever comes.

Building on 20 years’ experience of crisis comms and research, there will also be the chance to have your pressing questions answered.

Patrick is a qualitative researcher who works with people positively changing the world. Patrick’s firm, Outrageous Impact, is on a mission to put powerful research into the hands of charities and mission-driven organisations, in order to answer their most critical questions.

Outrageous Impact brings together an experienced network of senior researchers and communicators, from a range of disciplines, to help organisations to change the world faster.

During his career, Patrick has raised millions of pounds, changed laws and been involved in responding to global events including Grenfell Tower, Covid-19, and the migrant crisis.

Patrick recently founded CrisisConnections.info, connecting 80+ experienced professionals with charities around the world for free 1hr advice sessions.

Outrageous Impact has worked alongside organisations including Which?, Stroke Association, a Fortune 500 healthcare company, The Brooke animal charity, Time to Change and more.

 

                                   

EF webinar: Charity Advertising in a Time of Crisis

The global pandemic and its far-reaching effects have caused uncertainty and anxiety throughout the world. The Covid19 crisis has had a devastating effect on every corner of the economy. The charity sector is no exception.

Charities and not-for-profits are looking at what they can and need to do in order to capitalize on the new reality. New environments, relationships, and opportunities develop. Smart, focused marketing that strikes the right tone can help nonprofits overcome this time of crisis, stretch their budgets, find new audiences, and even grow.

In this discussion, we’ll evaluate the most pressing needs for Not-for-profit Organisations looking to survive and adapt to the current crisis. John Kearon, System1 C.E.O. and ESOMAR Foundation President will answer the following questions for you.

  • How Covid19 has impacted people’s feelings & behaviour around the world?
  • What impact Covid19 has had on people’s attitudes to Charities & their advertising?
  • How well are Charities doing in their communication in this time for crisis?
  • Will the impact of Coronavirus lead to an advertising reset for Charities?
  • How can Charities best succeed in this time of crisis?

This is a unique opportunity to learn about the value and potential for advertising for your not-for-profit organisation.

CEO of System1 Group PLC; voted most Innovative Research Agency in the world for the last 5 years running. John’s recipe for entrepreneurial success is; creativity, resilience, determination, perseverance, stamina, drive, imagination, resourcefulness, courage, self-belief, commitment, ability to go without sleep and a touch of madness.

Prior to BrainJuicer, John founded innovation agency, Brand Genetics and before that, John was Planning Director at Publicis having joined from Unilever, where he held a number of research and marketing positions. Since September 2017 he holds the President position at ESOMAR Foundation.

 

Live webinar 8 June 2020, 17:00 C.E.S.T | 16:00 B.S.T

 

                                   

From Panic to Pivot: A Practical Guide to Remote Programming (and Fundraising) for Charitable Organisations Operating during Times of Crisis

How can you be nimble in the face of events that impact the trajectory of your NPO’s mission? Challenges even in the best of times seem to emerge by the day and with them a call to pivot campaigns and adjust operations.

COVID-19 — the most recent and wide-reaching hurdle to date — has asked charitable campaigns to adapt like never before: adaption necessary to ensure operational longevity, economic health, and continued stakeholder support of charities and non-profits. And also undoubtedly leaving a lasting, seismic impact on our campaigns and communities.

In this discussion, we’ll evaluate the most pressing needs for Not-for-profit Organisations looking to survive and thrive while having to quickly pivot, weigh the opportunities (and options) for conscientious fundraising, and share how to leverage the resources your community needs now to ensure sponsorship dollars down the road.

Michelle has held executive and management level marketing and design positions in a variety of industries, from corporate to agency to nonprofit. Michelle is the Managing Director of Women in Research (WIRe), a nonprofit organization that champions diversity in the marketing research industry by arming women with the tools to develop professionally, build connections and stay inspired. She holds an advanced degrees in marketing and design and is a past recipient of the International Stevie Award for Women in Business, the Women in Business and the Professions World Award and the Best in Biz Marketing Executive Award. A devoted proponent of the arts, Michellevolunteers with a variety of community cultural activities and organizations. She lives in the mountains of Oregon in the U.S. with her husband, son, daughter, giant cat and tiny dog.

Jessica serves as the Marketing and Events Director for Women in Research, a non-profit who’s mission is to foster diversity in the Market Research industry. She received her MA in Critical Theory from Pacific Northwest College of Art and her BA from The Evergreen State College. Prior to her work with WIRe she served as a Thesis Advisor and Community Engagement Specialist at PNCA, assisting with the school’s vision of a more inclusive and accessible arts education. A lifelong proponent of slow and local food, she’s the co-founder of a community farmer’s market, has worked with organizations such as the YWCA in the service of eliminating racism and empowering women, and is a freelance content and writing coach.

 

Live webinar 11 May 2020, 17:00 C.E.S.T | 08:00 P.S.T

 

                                   

ESOMAR Foundation Webinar: Standing Out From The Crowd – NGO Marketing and Semiotics

The third sector is having an especially difficult time right now because of coronavirus. It’s hard to get donors to part with their money when they are worried about their own families and economic futures. But even before Covid-19, NGOs faced challenges of marketing themselves.

·         Challenges of differentiation. Some causes are rather over-crowded with similar charities so that it’s hard for the public to tell them apart.

·         Challenges of understanding donor motivation. In the private sector, brands are obsessed with consumer need. But where is the equivalent need in a potential donor?

·         Challenges of communication. Sometimes the marketing communications of an NGO are intended to say one thing but actually communicate something else to the public.

In recent years, a new form of research has become very popular with marketers. Its name is semiotics. It improves on traditional survey research in a host of different ways. Some of its key features are as follows.

·         It’s very cost-effective. Because it doesn’t usually involve asking consumers direct questions, you can do it for a fraction of the cost of a normal market research project.

·         It’s accessible. Semiotics is a craft skill that can be acquired by anyone who is motivated to learn. You don’t need specialist software or a degree in statistics.

·         The solutions it delivers are based on more than the preferences of individual donors. They arise from a deep understanding of mass culture. Donors aren’t all different from each other, their attitudes and opinions are formed by their membership of various cultural groups. With semiotics, you can address large audiences with culturally appropriate messages.

Dr. Rachel Lawes is the author of “Using Semiotics in Marketing” (Kogan Page, 2020), the very first book which provides a practical, step-by-step course in semiotics for marketers. In this webinar, designed especially for us, she passes on some techniques from semiotics that any NGO can start using right away to get donors on board and keep them there through difficult times.

 

Live webinar 13 May 2020, 17:00 CEST

 

                                   

ESOMAR Foundation Webinar: Measuring The Imagination

For our 4th Webinar of 2019 in the series: Advanced Research Techniques, we bring you some really new thinking: using the imagination of your audience to get them to really understand what you want to achieve and be inspired to help you.

Leigh Caldwell has long been at the forefront of research thinking – he was applying the theories of behavioural economics before the rest of us had even heard of it! And his new approaches and applications are truly pushing the boundaries of modern methods.

The latest discoveries in neuroscience, psychology and behavioural science tell us that people use their imagination a lot more than we used to think. It is not just for playing games or making up stories: the imagination is a crucial tool in making decisions, planning our future, remembering the past and even in how we perceive the world around us.

Consumer brands are starting to measure the imagination of their customers in order to optimise their marketing and product design. But these new discoveries could be even more important for NGOs and charities.

Your relationships with donors, supporters and volunteers are based largely on how they perceive and imagine the outcomes of your work. So to design your communications, fundraising strategy and even the way you deliver your services: you need to measure their imagination.

Leigh Caldwell will talk about the new science of the imagination, including “System 3”, the third component of the brain. He will show how you can create a map of how your audience imagines the world, and put your organisation in the perfect place in that map – to generate the greatest engagement, highest donations or most passionate support.

Register for our Webinar on Nov 21st and learn something really new and different. It’ll certainly make you think!

Leigh is a cognitive economist and founder of Irrational Agency, which leads the insights industry in turning the latest science into powerful market research tools. His book The Psychology of Price shows how to apply behavioural economics to pricing strategy, he has presented several times at ESOMAR Congress, as well as at the world’s leading scientific conferences in psychology and economics, and he was featured on the inaugural GRIT Future List in 2019.

 

Live webinar 21 November 2019, 17:00 CET

 

                                   

 

Communications in Research – Part2: Tell Your Story

On the 9th of July, ESOMAR Foundation hosted the 3rd webinar of the series Advanced Research Knowledge and Insights for Not-For Profit Organizations. The webinar zeroed in on the often-overlooked ingredient of every successful research project: communications. The online event was hosted by Phyllis Macfarlane, ESOMAR Foundation founding board member and featured Kai Jimenez, long-time communications professional now with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). This is the second of the 2-part series of tips and tools on how to upgrade your NGO’s communication and storytelling capabilities.

 

Tell Your Story

  1. Focus on the insights and human truths beyond the statistics.

Sometimes, we can get so enamored by our research project, or so engrossed in the new data we have at our fingertips, that we make the mistake of assuming that everyone is as enthusiastic as we are about the numbers. Unfortunately, that is simply not true, and it is even less true when the audiences we address are not technical experts in the same field.

This is why the focus in the way you communicate your research findings should be on the insights, not just the statistics. Insights are truths that you find by analyzing the data within the bigger context of other research, your field, or even human nature. These insights are what can be used to drive action or inform decisions, so use the data to prove your point or add information, but zero in on the insights to stay useful and relevant.

 

  1. Use the story of one to share the truth of many 

There is a famous though morbid line that goes, “one death is a tragedy, but a million deaths are a statistic.” As cold and depressing as this may sound, it reveals the way people process information. At some point, the numbers become too big for human minds to imagine, so even if the data is about something that we would otherwise feel strongly about, we tend to forget about the people that make up these large numbers and are unable to care deeply about what is being said.

This is why one way to strike a chord in the hearts of audiences is by using the story of one to share the truth of many. By presenting the data on the scale of the individual, audiences are given the space to empathize with the community’s experiences, sympathize with their plight, and ultimately build affinity with your advocacy.

There are several ways to go about this. The most common way would be to pick out interesting and resonant quotes from the interviews, focus group discussions, or any other qualitative data sets available to include in the report. Another way would be to choose a person who took part in the study and ask them to share their personal story, or even to create a fictional person to embody the average or typical person according to your research results. Whichever way you choose, remember to make sure that the story that is highlighted is actually representative of the results. Do not use outliers as it may only lead to confusion and misconceptions. In addition, if you choose to share the stories of real people, ensure that the way you share the story is not exploitative, and that informed consent was obtained to publicly share their own experiences. The goal should always be to amplify the voices of those who would otherwise go unheard.

 

  1. Use every relevant touch point to engage with your stakeholders

One of the most important assumptions that is always held true in the communications industry states that the most trusted businesses, industries, and brands are those that the public most frequently interact with in meaningful and relevant ways. This belief is backed up by many studies in many countries over time. This is why to build trust among your stakeholders and to get them to advocate for or contribute to your cause, it is important to repeatedly engage them through touch points that are relevant to them to convey stories and messages that are resonant with them.

Today, there are a multitude of ways to reach your audiences through different platforms, but because resources are not infinite, it is important to streamline and prioritize the channels that would yield the best results. To do this, return to your stakeholder map and understand the behavior of your stakeholders to correctly identify the most important touch points for your target audiences. Are you reaching out to millennials who spend 4-5 hours on the internet? Then social media might be the best way to reach them. Are you targeting high net-worth individuals? Then it might be better to make an impression in person through strategically chosen events. Only by knowing and understand your audiences can you choose strategically the best ways to reach them to create the best possib

About the Author:

Kai Jimenez is a researcher, strategist, and all-around storyteller. She recently transitioned into an international development neophyte, working to promote gender equality in Mongolia with the UN Population Fund. Prior to this role, she built her career in the private sector specializing in development and corporate communications, business strategy and innovations, and research and analytics. Her last role was to concurrently head the Corporate Development unit and the Research & Analytics unit of The EON Group, a multi-awarded public relations firm among the world’s top 250. She holds a Master’s Degree in Political Economy and gives talks on branding, storytelling, a and research in local and international forums.

 

Missed out the presentation? You can still check it here.

 

Communications in Research – Part1: Work Your Advocacy

Earlier this month, ESOMAR Foundation hosted the latest of the series Research Knowledge for Not-For Profit Organizations. The webinar zeroed in on the often-overlooked ingredient of every successful research project: communications. The online event was hosted by Phyllis Macfarlane (GFK & ESOMAR Foundation) and featured Kai Jimenez, long-time communications professional now with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). Below is the summary of the webinar in Kai’s own words.

The Case for Communications

When people think about embarking on a research project, the focus is usually all on the data and just the data. This is understandable, of course, because research projects are launched because organizations need information, but the truth is that every successful research project actually begins and ends with something a bit more human: a good story.

We live in a world where stories – not statistics – are what people remember, and more importantly, are what drive us to action. Good stories and messages are especially important in the development sector as we are constantly trying to get people to advocate for our cause, to be generous with their time and resources, and to change their behavior for the better. And to succeed in these admittedly difficult tasks, we need stories and messages that are reasonable to the mind (logical) but still touch the heart (emotional). Data and statistics are important because your audiences need a reason to believe in you, but it is necessary to go beyond simply stating the numbers and instead frame the information in a way that is relevant, memorable, shareable, and action-inspiring.

Even at a time when buzz words like “big data” and “analytics” are constantly used and overused, research projects still rely on strong and effective communications, especially at two important points in the process: first, at the beginning, when strong arguments are needed to garner the necessary support to kick off the project; and second, at the end, to maximize the investments made for the research by using the findings to draw more attention to the advocacy.

Here are some tips and tools that have powered the communications industry for years that you could use to level-up your own storytelling capabilities.

Part I: Work Your Advocacy

  1. Take the time to understand, map out, and profile your stakeholders.

Large-scale research projects are often multi-stakeholder activities, especially in the development sector. You will need a lot of help – from institutional backing, community participation to funding and technical support – and the long list of things you need will come from different individuals and organizations with their own unique set of priorities.

This is why the first and most important step of any communications initiative is to comprehensively map out and profile your stakeholders. Understanding your target audiences will guide you in choosing which individuals or organizations to prioritize, in crafting the right stories that are most relevant and resonant to them, and in identifying the most cost-efficient channels to engage with your stakeholders. Below are the key things you need to consider for your stakeholder map, and the guide questions you should be asking yourself for each.

Things to Consider What to Use it For Some Questions to Ask Yourself
Priorities & Values

 

 

Identifying common ground with your stakeholders to craft messages that are relevant to their priorities and concerns Which individuals or organizations are already outspoken advocates for your cause? Are there any organizations already working in the area of your advocacy, or companies with CSR programs aligned with your cause? For the specific stakeholders you have in mind, what are their known advocacies? What are their professional and personal interests that could encourage or hinder them from supporting you?

 

Behavior Identifying the best channels and moments to engage with your stakeholders What are their day-to-day activities? Where do they source their information? Do they still watch TV or do they source their entertainment purely online? Do they still read newspapers or do they get their news from Twitter? Would they be the type to trust an email, or do you need to speak with them in person?

 

Available Support Estimating the resources you can count on and categorizing your stakeholders based on the kind of support they give What kind of support or resources do they provide? Is it financial, in-kind, pro bono consulting, volunteered time? How long do they provide support? One-off or long-term?
Reputation Avoiding reputational risks by association, and ensuring that your partnership with them positively impacts your own reputation in the eyes of your other stakeholders and the public What’s the reputation of the individual or organization? How do they work with partners: are they known as fair and committed, or are they known for being very superficial supporters? Do they have any scandals surrounding them, or other risk areas you should be considering?
Existing Relationship Establishing trust to improve your chances in persuading your stakeholders Have you worked together before? Has your past experience with them left a positive or negative impression? Do you even have a relationship at all with them? If not, do you have mutual friends or communities that you can tap to reach them?
Key People Identifying and approaching the people who can make the most impact Who are the main decision-makers in the organizations you’re targeting? Whose opinions do those decision-makers respect? Are there any people within the organization who can advocate for your cause internally, or even externally?
Requirements Confirming qualifications, and guiding you in your path to becoming qualified in the mid- to long-term What are the technical, organizational, and documentation requirements for funding requests and partnerships?

 

  1. Shine the light on the outcomes to which your research will contribute.

When you finally do craft those messages and reach out to your stakeholders, make sure to include more than just a laundry list of your intended project output. While project proposals definitely need a list of concrete deliverables, the truth is that no one is driven to action by the promise of a report or several spreadsheets worth of data. Instead, shine the light of the outcomes that can be achieved because of the research that you will do.

For example, don’t just tell your stakeholders that you want to write a report on why parents in India are not giving their children this specific cheap and accessible medicine for diarrhea. Instead, tell them that you need the data to develop targeted interventions to reduce diarrhea among babies, which in turn would like to a decline in infant mortality. Don’t just promise your funders a presentation that will list down the ways teenage girls in Congo manage their menstruations. They want to know that their money will go into a research project that can point out the best way to give these girls widespread access to safe resources for personal hygiene, which in the long run would mean that they become better educated because they no longer need to skip a week of classes when they’re on their period.

Paint the big picture. Your advocacy is your organization’s greatest story, so use it to your advantage.

  1. It’s not about you. It’s about what you can do with and for them. 

The hard truth is that often we can get so caught up in telling our story, pitching our cause and talking about our work that we forget that effective communication should be a two-way street. Our stories and messages need to focus on not only on what we can do, but more importantly, what we can do with and for our audiences.

This is why stakeholder mapping and profiling is the key to successful communications. You need to find what they value, what drives them, what they believe and do, so that you could connect your advocacy story to what matters to them. Spell out how their support to your cause can impact their own lives, their jobs, and their organizations. For instance, will your climate change advocacy help make a company’s brand appeal more to eco-warriors? Will your community feeding program help reduce the load of local governments? Find and highlight these points of intersection between what you value and what they value.

 

Missed out the presentation? You can still check it here.

Watch this space for the second part of the webinar summary.

 

 

ESOMAR Foundation Webinar: Communications in Research

Every successful research project begins & ends with a good story.

Most of the time, people think that the research process is all about just the data, data, data. However, every successful research project actually begins and ends with something a little more human: a good story.

This webinar aims to help you find and tell your good story with actionable tips and tools that have powered the communications industry for years. The webinar will focus on two important pain points: gaining support to kick off your research project, and maximizing your research investment by sounding all the bells and whistles to publicize your research findings. The webinar will cover best practices in working your advocacy to garner the much-needed support for your research project among your stakeholders, be it in the form of government or institutional backing, funding, or even community participation and ownership. It also aims to help you close the loop by giving you ideas on how to turn your data into resonant and relevant stories that can hopefully change mindsets and spur behaviors.

This is an opportunity not to be missed for anyone working in or with the Non Profit sector. You will gain reliable and efficient measures which you can implement in order to amplify the voices of those who would otherwise go unheard. 

 

Kai Jimenez is a researcher, strategist, and all-around storyteller. She recently transitioned into an international development neophyte, working to promote gender equality in Mongolia with the UN Population Fund. Prior to this role, she built her career in the private sector specializing in development and corporate communications, business strategy and innovations, and research and analytics. Her last role was to concurrently head the Corporate Development unit and the Research & Analytics unit of The EON Group, a multi-awarded public relations firm among the world’s top 250. She holds a Master’s Degree in Political Economy and gives talks on branding, storytelling, a and research in local and international forums.

 

A lifelong market researcher currently working on the GfK Verein’s University Cooperation Programme to improve the quality of education in Market Research in Africa and China. Founding member and treasurer of the ESOMAR Foundation.

 

Live webinar 9 July 2019, 13:00 CEST